Saturday, September 12, 2015

Bicycle Lock Enlightenment Chain


Not the strongest chain in the rack

Lamp chain: not typically associated with bicycles. It took all my willpower not to grab the seat post and pull hard just to see if this wouldn't fall apart under about twenty pounds of force. If tough looking cables yield so easily as we've seen previously, I wonder what kind of resistance this would offer. Not enough, I imagine. Could be time to break out the little yellow public service cards to share locking tips. But this is so extreme, there might be something going on beyond lack of knowledge.

I'd like to leave the video below playing on a loop at the rack to try to raise the general knowledge level about these basic principles. I think locking skewers and having an uglier bike also can help. The video covers the basics, though. Basically, don't use a lamp chain as a bicycle lock.


 

6 comments:

  1. I confess that I once used a bungee cord as a lock.

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    1. The challenge would be to come up with the most secure way to do that, if that's all you had. Since I guess the most insecure aspect of the bungie is that it could easily be cut, I'm guessing the winner would route the bungie internal to something in order to make it less obvious and less cuttable.

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  2. Heck, I even mentioned JRA yellow cards in my blog post about it at http://dfwptp.blogspot.com/2012/08/desperation.html

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    1. How do you find old posts like that? It seems like the custom search widget I have ("Search this blog") is almost useless any more for that sort of thing.

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  3. Well, it's certainly a pretty looking chain… Lends a bit of a vintage feel…

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    1. It is, and also unique in its way. But I tend to see beauty in function in a bike rack context: a beefy lock, used effectively, securing the means of transport to work well enough to deter the average snatch-and-ride thief.

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