Thursday, October 30, 2014

This is Why I Can't Have Nice Derailleurs


Commute-ending chain suck. Scary. Cell phone pickup requested. Master link right there under the derailleur.

The final ride of the Biopace 48 chain ring set occurred on 10/30/2014. At approximately 7:50 am, under heavy pedaling force while being shifted with a dirty chain, it gave up the ghost. Born: 1989. Died: 2014, aged 25. RIP. 

Full and excellent chain suck study linkage: states that the chances of chain suck occuring with a new chain ring and new chain are nil. Done.

Biopace 48: it lives! Rise obsolete chain ring, rise from the dead! May you live 25 more!!


 

8 comments:

  1. I didn't know you could buy new Biopace chainrings...NOS?

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    1. Tucson GABA bike swap bargain. I think they were $9 NOS. Not an incredibly popular product. I'm not a proponent of them, but I'm not an opponent either.

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    2. My husband's MB 2 has Biopace chain rings. He says it's not a big deal and you easily get used to it. For you, NOS is a great find and a cheap replacement to get your bike running correctly. Last time I paid 25.00 (locally) for one chain ring!

      BTW, I couldn't wade through your link to chain suck. Too much information. My eyes glazed over.

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    3. I think the (old) conventional wisdom that Biopace is pretty good for steady cadence and distance and easier on the knees has been true for me on my commute. I maintain a steady, medium pace, and my knees are not bothered.

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  2. Replies
    1. Khal, I think I have narrowed down the problem to somewhere between the derailleur and the chain ring. More analysis may be necessary...

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    2. Of course, rear derailleur lack of tension could contribute as well...

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    3. After reassembly I will adjust the B screw and check, Steve.

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