Tuesday, January 1, 2013

The Quiet of Just Riding


Found it
Books mentioned:
Quiet by Susan Cain
Just Ride by Grant Petersen


If you love quiet, then seek quiet.

If you are nurtured by solitude, then it may be wise to ignore voices which tell you otherwise.

If being alone outside, beneath sunshine and blue sky, pedaling down an empty path with the breezes blowing across your skin takes you to a peaceful place of balance and flow, if feeling your muscles powering circles for miles just feels right, then go for a ride, and feel just right.




I read Quiet, a book about the merits of introversion by Susan Cain, over the holidays, and noted that the words "bicycle" and "bike" never appear it that book. I also recently read Just Ride by Grant Petersen, a sensible book about riding bicycles, and believe that it doesn't focus overmuch on the merits of introversion. Yet, these two books together form some sort of golden duo of perfect personal insight for me to kick off 2013.

This idea came to me while reading Quiet, to put together some detailed synthesis of the two books, built on the flow I feel or achieve while out on my rides of solitude. That, on the one hand, Susan Cain empowers me to fuel up with solo rides in the great outdoors, while Grant Petersen encourages me to ride whatever bike, in whatever way, that makes sense to me personally, on the other. There's a lot to unpack there, maybe a whole blog worth.

But not now. Not here. Two great books married together with a clear and significant impact to my way of looking at 2013 is enough for now, or rather, as far as I can take it right now. The three sentences at the top of this post are as far as I've gotten with it, at this point.


These go together like chromoly and lugs


So far, I've ridden every day in 2013. Off to a great, quiet start.

10 comments:

  1. Thank you, JRA. I too have ridden every day this year. I rode nine miles to work and am about to do another nine home.

    Happy New Year.

    Invisible.

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    Replies
    1. Happy New Year to you too, Invisible Man. It's quiet out there.

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  2. dude - it's twenty one below zero here. i haven't ridden my bike in a week. i miss it so big time. thanks for your blog. steven

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    Replies
    1. steven, twenty one below zero provides one of those super-still, quiet environments where everything is still and quiet, and it feels as if---nah, that's just really cold. Indoor rollers and a DVD of roads in Jamaica, I think.

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    2. -21 F would be a new record for me, but believe it or not, you were right - cold and snow provide a super stillness like few others and is best experienced on a bike. I think my coldest (but still very nice) ride was around - 23 C, -9.5 F. I'm always ready and willing to break that, Mother Nature willing...

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    3. RANTWICK it's interesting to me that at such cold temperatures, sweat management becomes difficult and maybe impossible. As cyclists, we have the advantage over a person sitting still in the cold of the internally generated heat that comes from the effort of pedaling, which makes the challenges much more those created by moving cold air combined with insulation breakdown caused by excess sweat. Paradoxical that you can overheat at -21F, and then have sweat be a problem, but very real. Fortunately, my own exposure to cycling in those temperatures is currently equal to none. +20F is going to be near or at a record low in Phoenix, and if it ever does hit that, I'll be so saddened by all the vegetation dying off around me that I won't care much about my own status.

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  3. i'm setting up two side-by-side trainers in the basement today. there's no tv screen down there so it'll have to be buds and choons for now!

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  4. If weather or whatever prevents a ride, then go for a long walk, eek, a hike in the mountains even. If I'm understanding the above blog post, my own introversion perhaps, there is merit in that as well.

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    Replies
    1. Yes, I believe you understood the post, and a hike into the mountains in the cool of our January sounds great, Don.

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  5. I rode on the first day of the year.

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