Saturday, February 25, 2012

Bell Placement Mystery


How do you work this?
OK, so there's no working derailleurs on a bike with 21 gear combinations (and a kickstand plate with no kickstand), and no rear brake, I still have to know: what is this bell doing back here? I guess if you are able to shift gears by hand by moving the chain manually, hitting this dinger without losing a finger in the spokes is no problem.

 

8 comments:

  1. What puzzles me, the dog that didn't bark, is the rear light - which I take to mean this isn't a crazy person. Could it be that the cassette is converted to a fixed-gear of many options, in the way that some fixies have cogs on both sides of the wheel?

    I'm projecting, but perhaps the bell is a ironic nu-Hipster amusement - s/he reaches down and rings the iconic bell, all the other hipsters look up, nobody has a bell on their minimalist handlebars?

    I hope you get to meet the rider, it's an interesting set of conflicting signals.

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    1. Phoenix is so flat that anyone who commutes on a bike with gears ends up thinking that they are just extra weight and complexity. One can seek out routes that go up/over/through the "sky islands" or increases in elevation that are called mountains around here (McDowell-Papago, Cave Creek, Tortilla Flats), but for the most part, it's flat flat flat, so I understand the impulse to take off the derailleurs and mostly stay in a single gear. In a way this person has the best of both worlds, since they could always gear down if needed. When I visit other cities, like San Francisco, Pittsburgh, Spokane, Staten Island, I'm struck by the hills there, and wonder how much stand-and-mash must be needed to ride a single speed in a place with hills like that.

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  2. Maybe one of them need to be legal thingys?
    You know, like putting your brake lever on the tt?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Not at the state level, maybe one of the cities around here requires it, but not that I know of.

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  3. I think that bell was put there to confuse guys like you.

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    Replies
    1. It's the utility of the thing which I seek, anniebikes. Of what use is a particular combination, and maybe I could steal a good idea, and avoid trying a bad one.

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  4. Kids these days… I’ve seen a lot of ‘em riding around on singlespeeds with no brakes (not fixed gear, mind you). They brake by jamming their shoe into that spot between the rear tire and the frame where the brake ought to be. Maybe, when demonstrating perfect foot-jam-braking form the bell sounds to indicate it. Ding! Nice form.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. mindful mule, I believe there was a front brake on this interesting bike. Perhaps the bell is to remind you to throw your weight backwards if you have to mash the front brake. If you can look straight down and watch yourself ring the bell, your weight distribution may be just about right.

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