Wednesday, August 31, 2011

Scottsdale Trolley Semi-Follow-Up



A trolley, pedestrian, and bicycles-only bridge

Way back in some colden days I wrote a quick post about the ease and economics (free!) of buzzing around Scottsdale on the free trolley. Steve asked me if bikes were welcome, and I learned since then that they are--there's a rack on the front like many of the Metro buses have. This is only a semi-follow-up since I haven't tried out the rack myself yet: being the impatient sort, if I had my bike, I would probably just ride it. But one type of situation could arise is that you need to return after the trolleys stop running, which seems to be a somewhat variable yet early time, and so you could take the bike along and use it to return. 

I do ride it sometimes, more as an unplanned convenience--oh hey there's a trolley let's jump on. But I love to walk, I really do, but don't that much any more since I ride my bike every chance I get instead of walking or driving or sitting around eating tortilla chips with salsa and guacamole with hot sauce dripped on. I did walk across Scottsdale on a rainy night a couple months ago because it was rainy and I wanted to walk, even though I had my bike, which I just left behind and walked back to later. Which sounds daft, but I think it helps to illustrate my commitment to walking even if I don't actually walk several miles a day like I used to before cycling pedaled to the fore. 

The walking love comes from a deep-seated and unshakable attachment to the great British walkers in history, the poets, the writers, the scholars, who would set off at a brisk pace clutching their Ordnance Survey maps, and cover twenty miles on foot easy. Then have tea and walk twenty miles more to get to the pub. Or else wander around London, which I've enjoyed doing a few times and will again. I like the sound my feet make on nighttime cobblestones, on gravel paths and on moonlit pine needles. It is still in the plans to walk to work a few days once the weather cools a bit. It's going to take 90 minutes or more each way, which sounds like a long time, but if the weather cooperates it will beat the heck out of driving 90 minutes each way, which a few people I know do, and walking is about 17 times more relaxing than driving. Heck, I'll go 20x on that one. And it appears that you can connect from the free Scottsdale to the free Tempe Orbit Earth circulator to get down to Tempe and probably connect with the Light Rail. I mention that only because it seems like a unique and creative way to get around, convenient and did I mention free to ride? Don't know if it accepts bikes though so that may be a follow-up-follow-up to check into.

   

3 comments:

  1. I find it odd that your blog eats any comments I make from my iPhone, but is happy to take them from my iPad.

    Anyway, another reason to ride the bus as part of your bike excursion is that those buses have nice AC. Most places that accommodate bikes on buses also allow them on light rail, at least when the rail isn't full.

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  2. Also, I LOVE the word "colden." I remember the colden days, back before global warming...

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  3. Steve when asked to respond to suggestions that this blog eats iPhone comments, it replied, "MMMMM, NOM NOM NOM NOM CRNCH CRNCH SNARFLE NOM CRNCH CRNCH TASTY DELICIOUS IPHONES NOM...erp"

    The light rail has nice bike locations with hooks for hanging bikes (I posted about that a long time ago, also in colden days).

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