Thursday, July 21, 2011

Pawprints in the Dust



neighbor cat posted on my wall

I caught a glimpse of him moving across the yard at dusk, a black streak silent in the grass.

After the dust storm, he left a message for me written on the window of the car that I would drive if I didn't commute by bicycle every day. Snapped a picture, rushed inside to get inside and cool off. Didn't look closely or think, didn't have time.

Later popped the card into the slot and reviewed the photos. Came across this one: whoa? What the heck? I didn't recognize it at first, so abstract, some kind of Cartesian grid with...oh yeah, my car window with dust and pawprints.

He came, he saw, he scampered, leaving a few pawprints in the dust, heading off to new directions and adventures, not looking back, not giving it a second thought. It sounds like a good idea: leave a few pawprints in the dust, a message no one reads, scamper off to new adventures, don't look back, don't give it a second thought.

Pawprints in the dust once read, once remarked, then forgotten.

5 comments:

  1. The prints send a message:
    wash your car.

    ReplyDelete
  2. The fact that the cat's footfalls register so neatly within the grid only adds to my certainty that cats are, in fact, our secret overlords.

    Clearly, the grid was designed to provide traction for cats, not to defrost your rear window -- regardless of the propaganda we've been fed by their minions at Toyota, Honda, Ford, and the like.

    :)

    ReplyDelete
  3. limom if I wash it more dust will come. Does an undriven car get washed?

    koko, I for one welcome our four-legged bewhiskered kibble-eating overlords. Cats have secretly infected us with a virus which causes cat-friendly design features to be incorporated into everything we make: agreed.

    ReplyDelete
  4. If you don't look at it, is it ever dirty?

    ReplyDelete
  5. limom I believe it was Lao Tzu who wrote of the dust in chp. 56. Maybe. Depending on the translation.

    ReplyDelete

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