Saturday, May 21, 2011

Tovrea Castle in Phoenix, From the Bike Lane



Tovrea Castle, and saguaros about to go POP!

Tovrea Castle is a Phoenix landmark that has served a few different purposes since its construction in 1928 (read its twists and turns on the wikipedia, here), but now is an almost-refurbished Phoenix "Point of Pride" with a lovely cactus garden all around it. I remember it best when it was lit up at night with lights around each tier of the wedding cake. When seen from the air, or from a distance, it was truly notable and odd. 


I've never been inside. But I ride my bicycle past quite often, and decided I needed to snap a few pictures.Some with signs in them.



The stories this place could tell! If stucco and cactus could tell tales, I mean. An understandable reaction when you see this place is similar to when you come across the gleaming white pyramid tomb of Governor Hunt, not too far from here: whaaaaaaaaaat?? Eventually, though, after you see them dozens of times over the years, they grow on you, and you stop noticing them. Then you ride by a little slower on your bicycle one day, and notice the different angles available for taking photos, and with a beginner's mind recall the essential weirdness of the wedding cake, but also its unique interest, and the memories of remembering. Get up. Go ride.

3 comments:

  1. Surreal.
    Reminds me of LEGOs.

    ReplyDelete
  2. Aren't you one of the collective owners of the "City of Phoenix," and thus a partial property owner of this castle?

    PS: Thanks for the rain...

    ReplyDelete
  3. limom I do want to visit when they reopen, to see if there is information on what the heck the architect was thinking. Also to browse the cactus garden.

    Steve, why yes, I guess I am. I am eager for them to reopen my castle. Next up for weather: sunny, hot, high pressure. Welcome to summer!

    ReplyDelete

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