Sunday, May 1, 2011

Populus Freemontii at Tempe Town Lake



Populus Freemontii - The Tree at the Narrows (a big metal tree sculpture at Tempe Town Lake) by Joe Tyler
shade me with your rusty leaves while the wind whistles through your iron boughs

There's another tree-that's-not-a-tree constructed to display leaves of people who donated money to plant real trees. This one is called "Populus Freemontii - The Tree at the Narrows" and is right by Priest Road and the end of the path on the north bank. 

Informational signage

I observed a troop of Boy Scouts with bicycles reading the sign and checking out the plant life along the north bank. It's plentiful, and does offer a good opportunity to study many types of native plant life.





It takes me back to LIZARD ACRES!!
(perfect recognition on my part BTW, it is the same artist)

It does need a rusted lizard or two...


Just an incredibly great day to be out riding a road bike. I did my tri-city tour (Phoenix, Scottsdale, Tempe), and saw many others out enjoying the warm day on two wheels. Get up. Go ride.

6 comments:

  1. A much cooler way of honoring donors than the usual names on bricks.

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  2. I like that tree better than the cement tree.

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  3. I can't even begin to express how cool that is to me. What a great way to not only honor the donors, but to pay respect to the cause.

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  4. It was great to just be riding along and then finding this tree. Hey, wait a minute, check it out, and I turned around. It is kind of in the middle of nowhere, near a freeway exchange, but it looked like it could be pleasant to sit a while in its rusty shade.

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  5. thanks for including the leaves details, i love this tree already :))

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    Replies
    1. I wonder if I could fabricate an additional leaf that says "m e l i g r o s a" on it, and find a spot up there for it...

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