Wednesday, August 25, 2010

Welcome to Phoenix



A burst of wind tore through the area along with a storm


The fence around the Soleri Bridge and Plaza project, which has been standing for months, all blew down.


The hard core rode through it all.

When it hits 111F+ and we have thunderstorms, they tend to be energetic, with strong, gusty winds, dust, lightning, and hail. Since this 'tis the season, I recently bought some goggles for bicycle commuting in case of storms, and boy did they earn their keep today. When the wind blasted in my face, as I rode past downed fences and trees, my eyes were serene and dust-free inside their tinted, vented capsule. I'm a moron for not getting some goggles before. In the past I've come home with dusted, tear-filled, itchy eyes that were red the next day. No more! Bring on the storms. I'll ride on. Get up. Go ride.

   

5 comments:

  1. Those sudden summer storms can be pretty nasty. It was 111 degrees her on Monday. I don't know how you can stand it.

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  2. Rat Trap you get used to it, and I much prefer the heat to the cold, snowy winters around the Great Lakes. When you have to shovel your roof to prevent ice dams, it's time to move.

    Steve, that's usually true. I consider in the 90s and really dry as just about perfection. This time of year adds in the humidity, which usually means rains, which we need. But when it gets humid here, it's starts to feel like other places, like Texas I guess, where that old heat index really kicks like a mule sometimes.

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  3. Mr. 100! Thanks so much for jumping in to follow my blog.

    I really like yours and have followed for a short while now. You change it up a lot. Good to hear from another desert cyclist.

    Big Clyde

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  4. Wow, crazy storm action!
    Can't believe you still rode the bike.
    At least with those clouds still hanging overhead.

    ReplyDelete

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