Friday, April 23, 2010

Commuting and Computing



Cargo Drama in the Desert


On the uncommon occasions that I take the laptop home from work, it gets strapped to the rack, as in the photo. I believe at the moment I took the photo, I was thinking of something along the lines of a connectedness between the Pony Express people in the "Passing the Legacy" statue and me commuting by bike with my computer. Mammal-powered cargo carrying or something like that. But, that's kind of a stretch. Then I remembered that the stations were 10 miles apart on average, which means that I commute a little farther each day than a pony in the express usually galloped between stations. They were all about speed and carrying the mail from point A to point B, while I am just out to enjoy the ride. So my analogy would have been pretty stretched out, but then it is a pretty long distance from this location of this monument in Scottsdale, Arizona to the actual route of the Pony Express, which went through Utah and Nevada 1860-61, so some elongation of perspective is perfectly in order. In fact, one commonly used search and mapping engine suggests this novel 729 mile, three day route to ride a bike from this spot to the historic Pony Express route. If you can ride 729 miles in three days on bike, you should be the freaking Pony Express. I don't think I would try to take the computer on that trip. Get up. Go ride.  

4 comments:

  1. You'd just have to average 11.2mph over 65 hours.
    I can do that.
    In about three weeks.

    ReplyDelete
  2. Three weeks, that would be the Pony Super Saver Free Shipping, not the Express.

    ReplyDelete
  3. Bring your computer. How else are you going to blog your progress.

    ReplyDelete
  4. I'll just schedule seven or eight days worth of posts that say "Exhausted. Sore. Ate a lot of bugs today. More of the same tomorrow. Too tired to write any more."

    ReplyDelete

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